Film

America + Four Women + Illusions

 
 
Sat, Oct 12, 2019
  • 7PM
 
 
LOCATION:
 
RUN TIME: 72min
GENERAL ADMISSION: $16
MEMBERS: $8 (free for Level 4 and above)
+  Post-screening conversation with Julie Dash and Garrett Bradley
 
 
 
 
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Saturday October 12, 2019
Performances no longer available.
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Post-screening conversation with Julie Dash and
Garrett Bradley

 
America

Dir. Garrett Bradley
With Donna Crump, Edward Spots
2019, 30min, DCP

 

Taking as its starting point the recently rediscovered Bert Williams feature Lime Kiln Club Field Day (1913)—the first known film to feature an all-Black cast—Garrett Bradley’s extraordinary new short imagines an entire lost lineage of African-American cinema, where images of Black joy, strength, and beauty live on forever in a free-floating celluloid dream space. Shot in gorgeously poetic black and white and set to an intricately layered audio collage, America is an ecstatic sensory experience that rewrites our visual history in the name of Black empowerment.

An Aubin Pictures production. Produced by Lauren Domino and Catherine Gund.

 
Four Women

Dir. Julie Dash
1975, 8min

 

The gorgeously expressive breakthrough work by Julie Dash (Daughters of the Dust) features dancer Linda Martina Young inhabiting and deconstructing four archetypes of Black femininity, set to the strains of the soul-shaking Nina Simone ballad that gives the film its name.

 
 
 
Illusions

Dir. Julie Dash
1982, 34min

 

Julie Dash explores race and representation in World War II-era Hollywood via the story of a Black movie studio executive passing as white and the African-American singer she hires to dub the voice of a white actress. What plays out is a profound, haunting deconstruction of Hollywood’s power to shape racial mythologies.

 
 
 
Garrett Bradley
 
Bio
Garrett Bradley

Garrett Bradley’s multimedia work draws together broad themes of oppression and conflict with a particular emphasis on place and location. Across a body of moving-image productions that blend elements of documentary and fiction, cinema and video art, Bradley’s camera situates wider themes in the minute textures of the everyday, exploring her subjects’ struggles and dreams and rooting the sociopolitical in personal and physical experience. Bradley consistently locates her subjects in particular places—frequently her home city of New Orleans—that become sites of a confrontation between personal narratives and larger historical and political ones.



 
 
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